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7 Stepsto Optimize Your Images for Search

Quick– describe this photo in under ten seconds:

Great, now I know you’re human and you can recognize a smilingorca whale when you see one. But imagine if you were a Google bot – how would you have any idea what was in this photo? Until image recognition technology takes over (and it’s already getting a little creepy, thank you Facebook), that’s where image search optimization comes in.

You already know that search engine optimization can go a long way toward increasing the number of people who find your site from organic searches. But the little sister of Google Web Search, aka Google Image Search, is tugging on your shirt hem and demanding some attention too. So while you’re busy Teva Mens Terra Float Univ 20 Sports and Outdoor Lifestyle Sandal Multicolor Tancion Black/Grey Tbgy UjuazlIC1
, don’t forget about your images. If you’re an image-heavy website, this is especially applicable for you, so listen up close.

Here’s the big picture: you have to help Google’s bots understand what’s in the photos on your site. With that in mind, here are our 7 tips for maximizing SEO for your images.

Images should not be given names such as wpd858932702.jpg. Use the name as an opportunity to inform Google about the subject of your image by incorporating relevant keywords. We named the photo above “Happy Orca Whale.”

These are additional fields which you can use to tell Google about the subject of your image. You can re-use the keywords you used for the image name, or try to pursue other keywords in these fields. Alt text is what will appear for people using adaptive technology, like screen readers. It’s also the title that will show when people hover over the image.

Google doesn’t look at your image in isolation; it also looks at what page it’s on, what keywords are in the page copy, what keywords are in the site URL, etc. Thus, it is important that there exists high-quality and relevant content around the image. Make sure to surround each image you use with some descriptive text — it’s not only good for SEO, but it makes your site a whole lot more engaging.

Having big, important sites send traffic to your site is great for your domain authority and, therefore, great for your SEO. Providing Ivanka Trump Women’s Parin Ankle Boot Black Suede nqPIGcnAy
is a nifty way to take advantage of their rankings. Since Google ranks images on the page copy that the image is located, having an image featured on Wikipedia or other well-trafficked photo-sharing sites helps signify to Google that the image is both relevant and credible.

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The transgender coverage policy at Starbucks is a direct parallel to WPATH’s international recommendations for trans healthcare.

By Mary Emily O'Hara

After a year of working in tandem with the World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH), Starbucks has announced a new benefits package that offers extensive coverage to trans employees.

The coffee company has included coverage for gender-reassignment surgeries in its employee health plan since 2012. But now, a six-page document titled Starbucks Transgender Medical Benefits, described in a on the company’s website, lists lifetime coverage for everything from hair graft and voice therapy to facial feminization and breast augmentation — services considered vital for transgender healthcare but often listed as ‘cosmetic’ and not covered by health insurance.

“Last year, as a result of conversations with transgender partners who provided their feedback, Starbucks took a fresh look at the health care benefits in order to see where we could improve,” said a Starbucks spokesperson in an email to them. on Tuesday. Starbucks refers to its employees as partners.

The transgender coverage policy at Starbucks is a direct parallel to WPATH’s international recommendations for trans healthcare. And Starbucks is the first company in the world to approach WPATH about turning the organization’s Standards of Care into corporate policy.

“Starbucks was not afraid to ask all the right questions and demand that people get the best possible care,” said Jamison Green, former President of WPATH and current member of its executive committee, in an interview for the Starbucks website on Monday. “We produced a list of the most crucial benefits and those that are deemed problematic to insurance companies, such as facial feminization and electrolysis.”

Green did not immediately respond to a request for further comment via email.

The company’s Vice President of Benefits, Ron Crawford, said the yearlong effort began with trans employees who raised the issue of coverage.

“I view this as a diagnosis with a treatment path,” Crawford said on the company website . “You have to think of it from an equity perspective.”

The WPATH Standards of Care booklet is a 120-page list of recommendations for mental health and medical providers that serve adults, adolescents, and children. First published in 1979, it’s now in its seventh revision, compiled and updated by over 30 doctors, medical and psychological professionals, and an international advisory board.

Each year, as part of its Corporate Equality Index survey, the Human Rights Campaign lists businesses that offer employees at least form of transgender-specific health coverage . In 2018, there are a record 759 businesses listed — up from less than 50 in 2009.

But rarely, if ever, has a corporate employer offered coverage that conforms to WPATH standards — a problem that starts with insurance companies that consider most transition care to be purely cosmetic. According to the 2015 U.S. Transgender Survey , 55 percent of trans people who sought coverage for transition-related surgery were denied, and a quarter of people were denied coverage for hormones by their insurance providers.

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posted on the Starbucks website Monday, Crawford said the company hopes to share the benefits policy it created in tandem with WPATH with any other employer that wants to provide more trans-inclusive coverage.

“Nobody else is doing this,” said Crawford in the interview. “We would love to see more employers doing this.”

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NAPA Net | Understanding Legal Risks with Retirement Plan Missing Participants - NAPA Net

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7/11/18

Ted Godbout 7/11/18 Add Comment

In addition to being an administrative headache, the inability to locate terminated participants of qualified retirement plans can result in heightened legal risks, a recent blog post reminds readers.

The law firm of Bond, Schoeneck King in its post, “ Legal Risks Associated with a Retirement Plan’s ‘Missing Participants,'” explains that a plan’s inability to locate terminated participants can result in a breach of fiduciary duty under ERISA – as well as plan disqualification – despite well-intentioned efforts by plan sponsors.

The firm reviews the Department of Labor’s (DOL) 2014 Field Assistance Bulletin regarding efforts that must be made to locate missing participants; it further warns that the agency, more recently, has reportedly become more aggressive in contesting administrators’ actions regarding missing participants.

The post cites a 2017 letter by the American Benefits Council alleging that DOL regional offices have been taking more aggressive positions, asserting, among other things, that a plan administrator’s failure to locate a missing participant is a fiduciary breach, even when the procedures have been followed.

RMD Failure

Moreover, the firm emphasizes that the inability to locate a participant “does not necessarily excuse” a plan’s failure to complete a requirement minimum distribution and could jeopardize the plan’s qualified status.

It points to an October 2017 IRS Employee Plans Examinations memorandum directing examiners not to challenge the qualified status of a plan for violating RMD requirements based on an inability to locate a terminated participant if the plan had taken certain steps, such as searching records of other employer plans, using a commercial locator service and attempting to contact by certified mail.

“Given the recent DOL and IRS focus on enforcement of this issue, retirement plan administrators should review their systems and procedures for maintaining and correcting participant and beneficiary contact information, and determine if they are adequate,” the firm advises.

PSCA Urges Action

Similarly, the Plan Sponsor Council of America (PSCA), a part of the American Retirement Association, recently urged the DOL, Treasury Department and IRS to issue guidance on missing participants. PSCA’s comments were in response to recent DOL enforcement activity, as well as a Government Accountability Office (GAO) request.

The organization reiterated recommendations it had proposed in April 2017, outlining 10 steps for locating missing participants for certain plans while continuing to meet fiduciary obligations and not putting a plan’s qualified status in jeopardy.

“Although the DOL and IRS have, separately, issued guidance regarding the proper steps for plan sponsors to take to locate missing participants for certain plans, there is no guidance on missing participants that provides comprehensive, consistent guidance to plan sponsors,” PSCA states. “As such, plan sponsors, especially small plan sponsors, are left to cobble together, and attempt to harmonize, the guidance issued by the two agencies.”

PSCA also joined a letter to the DOL regarding this issue sent by a group of concerned trade organizations.

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